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Layin down the law..

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ronnie35
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Question

Post by ronnie35 » Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:22 am

I always get confused on this if an exclusive library has a song you composed but, you do not have a placement through that library can you still submit that same song to another exclusive library?
Ron
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superkons
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Re: Question

Post by superkons » Tue Sep 15, 2020 9:37 am

Well, exclusive means exclusive, therefore it cannot be signed to more than 1 library.
Some libraries have reversion clauses in place, they keep the music for some specified time, after which you may ask to have it back, therefore making it pitchable again

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andygabrys
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Re: Question

Post by andygabrys » Tue Sep 15, 2020 10:10 am

ronnie35 wrote:
Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:22 am
I always get confused on this if an exclusive library has a song you composed but, you do not have a placement through that library can you still submit that same song to another exclusive library?
Ron
Time to read your contract Ron.

Look over the sections that include what rights you sign away when you sign exclusively.

There are two basic situations:

1) you retain the IP (i.e. the copyright) and the library has exclusive control for X years at which point if you are not happy you can ask for it back and sign it to somebody else. The actual reversion if its been used in a production is messy though and it will need to be retitled and only a non-exclusive publisher will likely sign it.

After control reverts to you, an exclusive publisher who works with foreign sub-publishers will not sign the piece because they can't be sure that they are the only ones controlling the piece.

anyway - if you write to your library and ask to have the piece reverted to your control, then after that is done you can pitch it to someone else (subject to the caveat above).

2) you sign away (transfer) the copyright to the exclusive library - in this case, its usually in perpetuity and you don't have anything to ask for - its gone for ever. This is very common these days.

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