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file types and storage

Posted: Fri Jul 31, 2020 5:16 pm
by GPDoc
I just read this in the Taxi Transmitter, understand that it is referring to types of audio files but have no idea as to the differences between these, also don't know if the speaker is saying that the music is stored over again in all those files routinely, or if he just has the capability of efficiently changing to whatever file type is needed. Any clarification would be appreciated. Are these all different kinds of wav files or something different?



"One thing I really learned… Because I was writing with my son and we would exchange files, and because I was traveling a lot, he had all the files. But they were MP3s and they wanted the WAV file. And now I know that in the cloud I have WAV 4416; I have 192, 128, 320; I have AIFF. I have them all, and then for all the stems and all that, so it’s a lot. So if I ever get a call, I can download whatever that person needs then, right then and there."

Re: file types and storage

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 2:04 am
by cosmicdolphin
WAV 4416 = Wave File at 44k 16bit . So this is the standard lossless format used by Pc's at a sample rate of 44 kilohertz...this is the number of slices per second the audio is chopped up into .... 16 bit...this is the bit depth or number of bits of data in each sample. You don't really need to understand it but 44K 16bit is the standard for CD Audio, though in Broadcast it's more normal to be asked for 48k 24bit

..192, 128, 320 are all MP3 bitrates . As MP3 is a lossy file format ( i.e. it throws away information it thinks we can't hear ) which allows much smaller file sizes. The the higher the bitrate the less data is thrown away and the better the perceived quality. At 320k most can't tell the difference from a 44k 16bit Wave file

AIFF - This is the Apple version of a Wave file

I've not read the article but it sounds like the author is bouncing down multiple file formats and storing them in the cloud for easy access, Personally I would just bounce the 48k 24bit Wavs as that's mostly likely to get asked for and if they want anything else you can transcode it from there.

Hope that helps

Mark

Re: file types and storage

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 6:39 am
by Ted
Mark, what practice should we be in when recording music for Taxi in our DAWs? I'm pretty sure all of my stuff has been recorded at 44.1k...

When I go to bounce the tracks down it gives me the options of 44.1k, 48k etc.... does it make any difference? If my DAW is set up to record at 44.1k and then I bounce at 48k is that gonna be a problem?

Re: file types and storage

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 8:41 am
by GPDoc
That helps a whole lot, Mark. Thank you.

Ted, I am super new at all aspects of this, and I use a porta studio rather than a DAW (and I know that DAW would give me more options but it's what I have, and know, for now) but in case it's relevant to your question, I made my first submission to Taxi and it was all set up on 16 bit 44k. Afterwards I read that, if forwarded, what would most likely be needed would be 24bit 48k. When I tried to convert my song it was not possible. So I had to record the entire song over again with my equipment set to 24/48 from the very beginning. I did it just in case I got lucky, so I would be ready with what the client wanted. Still waiting to hear if I might really need it. Long shot but nothing ventured.....

Re: file types and storage

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 9:01 am
by cosmicdolphin
Ted wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 6:39 am
Mark, what practice should we be in when recording music for Taxi in our DAWs? I'm pretty sure all of my stuff has been recorded at 44.1k...

When I go to bounce the tracks down it gives me the options of 44.1k, 48k etc.... does it make any difference? If my DAW is set up to record at 44.1k and then I bounce at 48k is that gonna be a problem?
It's fine, it's just that the 48k standard was set for technical reasons back in the day. You can't discern any quality difference. My DAW is set to 44.1k 24bit as well.

Re: file types and storage

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 9:06 am
by cosmicdolphin
GPDoc wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 8:41 am
That helps a whole lot, Mark. Thank you.

Ted, I am super new at all aspects of this, and I use a porta studio rather than a DAW (and I know that DAW would give me more options but it's what I have, and know, for now) but in case it's relevant to your question, I made my first submission to Taxi and it was all set up on 16 bit 44k. Afterwards I read that, if forwarded, what would most likely be needed would be 24bit 48k. When I tried to convert my song it was not possible. So I had to record the entire song over again with my equipment set to 24/48 from the very beginning. I did it just in case I got lucky, so I would be ready with what the client wanted. Still waiting to hear if I might really need it. Long shot but nothing ventured.....
You should easily be able to upsample the 44-16 file to 48-24 using some audio software, no doubt there are some free ones out there. Practically speaking I couldn't imagine doing all this stuff on a multi-tracker. I mean I owned a 4 track and then an ADAT but the amount of edit requests, Alt MIxes, Stems etc needed in this line of work would be a huge PITA to get done.

Re: file types and storage

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 12:14 pm
by GPDoc
Mark and Paul, I sure appreciate all the help. I will look into the software options, as you suggest. So, if I already have a song transferred from my recording equipment to my computer, then would Audacity allow for the modification of the song from 44-16 to 48-24, or would the use of Audacity require that the song be on a DAW?

Re: file types and storage

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 3:46 pm
by CTWF
GPDoc wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 12:14 pm
Mark and Paul, I sure appreciate all the help. I will look into the software options, as you suggest. So, if I already have a song transferred from my recording equipment to my computer, then would Audacity allow for the modification of the song from 44-16 to 48-24, or would the use of Audacity require that the song be on a DAW?
It has nothing to do with a DAW. I think you would just drag and drop your WAV into Audacity, set to 48-24 in the preferences, and that would be how Audacity would treat it from now on. HOWEVER, I don't think you can choose 24bit as a WAV export option in Audacity, only 16 or 32. But internally it can work at 24bit. At least that is how I understand it.

Tom

Re: file types and storage

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 4:14 pm
by cosmicdolphin
GPDoc wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 12:14 pm
Mark and Paul, I sure appreciate all the help. I will look into the software options, as you suggest. So, if I already have a song transferred from my recording equipment to my computer, then would Audacity allow for the modification of the song from 44-16 to 48-24, or would the use of Audacity require that the song be on a DAW?
I've never used Audacity but generally in most Wave editors this sort of thing can be done, I use Wavelab personally ..or you can get a free copy of Cakewalk which will do the job

Re: file types and storage

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 6:19 pm
by GPDoc
Thanks, guys. I guess the next step is to jump in and test the waters.