Possible member (reluctant)

Did you get a deal through TAXI? Lets hear about it!

Moderators: admin, mdc, TAXIstaff

crabtwins
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 7:43 am
Gender: Male
Contact:

Possible member (reluctant)

Post by crabtwins » Thu Aug 30, 2007 4:14 am

Hello Forum, Forgive me if this is the wrong forum, but I am interested in Success as I am sure everyone else. I have a few questions. I produce Hip Hop but I know that my instrumentals can carry so much more than a song, considering the simpleness of most hip hop these days. I know to that it is great music for film and tv as well as songs. But I am not sure where i can look for the opportunities. I hear alot about libraries and listings, but I havent been able to find any. How do i know if my genre is well supported by taxi?Also lets say that I get a forward and someone actually wants to use my music, How is the contract done? Through TAXI?Well that's just for starters. It seems like people obviously have success but I guess I wish i could here from the people that arent having success and if wished they'd have none something before signing up. My money's tight.thanks

clonsberry
Impressive
Impressive
Posts: 165
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:00 am
Gender: Male
Location: Charleston, SC
Contact:

Re: Possible member (reluctant)

Post by clonsberry » Thu Aug 30, 2007 4:41 am

Ooh.. a question I can answer!I know I've seen a decent number of hip-hop listings (with and without vocals) in the few months I've been on board. One thing you can always do is look at the listings and decide for yourself if it's enough. They're out there for all to see. (You just can't make much use of them until you join.) The only thing I don't think you can get are the Dispatch listings. Dispatch is an "upgrade" to a regular membership where you get listings that come in where they may need music faster than a normal posting would allow.. for example.. company needs music and the deadline is three days. Once you join Taxi, they'll sign you up to see that list as well but.. again.. can't do anything with them until you upgrade to Dispatch.If you get a forward, it still doesn't mean that the lister will use it. But you're in the door and have a better chance. If they want to use it for whatever, they'll contact you. The contract is entirely in your hands. Taxi doesn't get involved.I can also speak as someone who hasn't had any forwards. Although, I'm astounded at the number of professional and constructive (not to mention creative) ways that Taxi's reviewers have learned to say "that sucks, go back and rewrite it". I say that tongue-in-cheek. Truth is, even the rejections have been useful to me as a songwriter. In my rejections, I've found that I need to pay more attention to song form and that I tend to "talk too much" musically.. too many intros in the middle of my songs.. leads too long.. cut 4 measures here... shave 2 there. Things I never would've been aware of. The songs I'm writing now are put together better than they were 4 months ago. Far from perfect.. but I'm learning thanks, in a great part, to Taxi.And that's not even considering the education and feedback I've gotten from the great people on the forums. I've learned a lot about how and why things work with the art and the business that I haven't seen in books yet (although I'm still doing a lot of reading). I have great respect for.. well.. all of them really.So, would I do it again? You bet! I'm probably not going to do Dispatch yet because I'm still ramping up to keep up with the regular listings (and it would be really nice to get to where I can actually get a forward first). But when I get there, I'll do Dispatch as well.If there's anything else I can answer, feel free to ask. If I don't know, I'm sure someone here knows.

crabtwins
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 7:43 am
Gender: Male
Contact:

Re: Possible member (reluctant)

Post by crabtwins » Thu Aug 30, 2007 5:17 am

Clonsberry, Thanks alot I appreciate the time you took to respond. The other question I have is do you get feedback on every song you forward or upload?thanks again.I just hate that im so paranoid. But I need to get my music out there. I have spent a long time getting my music and skills up to par and now im ready to sell it. Thing is I here about upgrade prices to dispatch and my little devil or angel on my shoulder says "red flag".ok thanksoh wait. I found it. I clicked on industry listings from the front page. I saw some stuff that was good to see. Question :Is that what members see when looking for listings or is it in a different format?Also what are these music libraries that I am hearing about?thanks

clonsberry
Impressive
Impressive
Posts: 165
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:00 am
Gender: Male
Location: Charleston, SC
Contact:

Re: Possible member (reluctant)

Post by clonsberry » Thu Aug 30, 2007 6:17 am

There are listings that are "YES/NO" and don't get feedback. Most of them do. That's something else you can see in the listings. If you submit a song or piece of music for a listing, it costs $5 whether it's a regular listing and you get feedback or it's a yes/no listing.You can also get a custom critique for $20 which, from the one I got, is more detailed than the standard feedback. These are songs your not submitting to a particular listing. You're just asking Taxi to go thru it and give you feedback. I'm not sure if the difference in detail is by design or if mine just worked out that way but, at the end of the day, both have been reasonable. There was a lot of information in the custom critique. I'll end up using the custom critique again.I think some people will see a listing, send a song for a custom critique to get feedback on it, and then submit the changed song for the actual listing.For people who like to send CD's, that option is there but I'd rather do everything online. I'll upload songs that I think might be useful someday as well as songs that I've done for a specific listing. They sit up on the Taxi hard drives until I actually submit them for a listing. So.. to be clear, just uploading a song doesn't really mean too much other than the fact that it's up there and ready. There's no Taxi interaction with those that I'm aware of and no feedback or review. Once you submit a song to a listing, that's when you get your feedback, if it's a feedback listing.With any of those songs that are just waiting to be submitted, you can make them public so other Taxi members (and the general public) can listen to them. That's also a great chance for feedback.As far as upgrades to Dispatch, I was a little nervous about more money too but, at this point, I haven't done Dispatch and I think basic Taxi has been well worth the money. Actually, it's nice that you can see what you're buying into before you shell out any cash. You can see listings before you join and you can see Dispatch before (and if) you upgrade. So there are no surprises. I think Taxi's very up front and I wish everyone would let you "peer in" before you buy.Those are the same listings I see. They also come in your email. (I'm a geek at heart so I take that list, dump it into a database, click on the ones I want to ignore and sort it all by due date.) The listings come out twice a month.Libraries: As I understand it, if I'm a filmmaker and I need 60's hippie music, it may be cheaper and/or easier for me to contact a library that may have a collection of 60's hippie music.. or hip-hop.. or whatever specific type of music. Companies build these libraries and market themselves to the studios, etc. So I would build a collection of, for example, 1960's hippie music and then go to the filmmakers and studios and say "If you want 1960's hippie music, I'm your guy cause I have the biggest collection of hand picked 60's hippie music anywhere just waiting for you." And then they'd buy my catalog so they could pick and choose what they want.There's a great YouTube series on TV/Film placement done by Matt Hirt (Taxi member and frequent forum poster) that's got some really good information in it.http://youtube.com/watch?v=6FguwMMsDZA

crabtwins
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 7:43 am
Gender: Male
Contact:

Re: Possible member (reluctant)

Post by crabtwins » Thu Aug 30, 2007 6:58 am

Hey thanks alot for the link man I appreciate it. I am still going to look around but it looks like you are definitely happy. That's cool. I wish I new other competitors of TAXI so I could research. Thanks

crabtwins
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 7:43 am
Gender: Male
Contact:

Re: Possible member (reluctant)

Post by crabtwins » Thu Aug 30, 2007 7:27 am

I am watching that youtube video it's great. I thought of a question. If I get forwarded. And lets say company x wants a song of mine. Do they pay me right away for it and then have complete rights to it? Is the fee negotiable or do they make an offer? For instance lets say they want to pay 100$ for something and they dont use it. I cannot use it later for a different artist or client?thanksI'm seeing some mixed reviews on the web for TAXI but Im trying.

User avatar
hummingbird
Total Pro
Total Pro
Posts: 6885
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 11:50 am
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Possible member (reluctant)

Post by hummingbird » Thu Aug 30, 2007 9:04 am

Quote:I am watching that youtube video it's great. I thought of a question. If I get forwarded. And lets say company x wants a song of mine. Do they pay me right away for it and then have complete rights to it? Is the fee negotiable or do they make an offer? For instance lets say they want to pay 100$ for something and they dont use it. I cannot use it later for a different artist or client?thanksI'm seeing some mixed reviews on the web for TAXI but Im trying.It all depends on the deal. For example, my recent deal is an exclusive agreement with a music publisher with a two-year reversion clause. I get 100% of the songwriting and they get 100% of the publishing. That means I cannot pitch it elsewhere or make other agreements for the song's use. I received no money up front, as the money (for both me and them) will come when and if they make a deal for that piece of music. I've since seen two other opportunities for exactly that kind of music. My solution - write another one.This stuff is pretty complicated. Matt is (mostly) talking about dealing with music libraries.I'm quoting an article on Taxi's site:"SO WHAT'S THE DEAL?There are different deals for different people and situations.Says another representative from a major music library, "Not all deals are the same, but most music libraries structure their deals 50/50."This means that you retain your "writer's share" of a composition (or 50 percent of the earnings), and the music library takes over the "publisher's share" (the other 50 percent of the earnings).The types of income you make could include up-front negotiated synchronization ("synch") fees (for the rights to synch music with visual images), and a master-use fee (for the rights to use the master recordings of a song). Furthermore, you could earn "back-end" performance royalties paid to you directly by your affiliated performing rights organization: ASCAP, BMI, SESAC (for the public performance of your compositions—in television and also in films aired in foreign territories—after your song has been broadcast.)The music library could hold the "exclusive" right to license your songs for audio-visual uses for a term of one to five years, with the rights reverting back to you after the term. This means that during the term, you or another music library (or any company for that matter) cannot license the song for any audio-visual use specified in your contract. This is the type of deal that artists and bands are reluctant since their rights are somewhat tied up. But note you usually can use the song on your own CD and collect royalties from sales if such is negotiated.Non-exclusive deals are also possible, meaning there are generally no limits to the licenses you generate.These are the deals bands want to negotiate for. But in case you're wondering how two different companies can use the same song and collect its share of performance royalties from its affiliated PRO, music libraries have adapted the practice of "renaming" (yes I mean re-titling) your work to differentiate it from the placements you get. The song is exactly the same as the original since no melodic or lyric content is changed, but the library will nonetheless treat it as a "derivative" work of the original. It is this derivative work in which the library acquires its rights.EVERYTHING COMES WITH A PRICEIf all this talk about percentages and giving up some publishing rights to a music library still has you a bit perturbed, the following points may offer some relief:1) Music libraries are businesses just like any other. Their reputation, industry contacts, and time and effort used toward getting you placements comes at a premium—that is the right to license your songs and collect their share of royalties for the uses they get you.2) Music libraries don't want to be put in direct competition with other music libraries that could be pitching your songs into the same T.V shows or films. Having the exclusive rights to license your music gives them more control from this happening.3) Music libraries sustain their businesses significantly through licensing your songs and master recordings, and the performance royalties paid directly by its P.R.O(s). This in part serves as its incentive for pushing your songs.SUMMING IT ALL UP: 50 PERCENT OF SOMETHINGMusic libraries offer you the opportunity to get your music placed and to make a few bucks. The right placement in a TV commercial, film, movie trailer, and video game might even draw some attention toward your career as a solo artist or band and that big hit you have locked away in "your drawer."One representative at a small but very successful boutique library offers these simple words of wisdom: "If you're a new artist who's having a difficult time getting your music heard, music libraries can offer you an outlet. Fifty percent of something is infinitely better than 100 percent of nothing."He continues, "The best part about working with a music library or smaller publisher that focuses on Visual Media placements is that it requires no additional effort on your part. Your song and recording are already done. The rest is up to us. It's like a putting your own marketing team to work for you."Source - http://www.taxi.com/transmitter/0606/headlineC0606.html
"As we are creative beings, our lives become our works of art." (Julia Cameron)

Link: Vikki Flawith Music
Link: For the 'Shy Singer'
Link: The Shy Songwriter's Blog

User avatar
hummingbird
Total Pro
Total Pro
Posts: 6885
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 11:50 am
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Possible member (reluctant)

Post by hummingbird » Thu Aug 30, 2007 9:08 am

Quote:Also lets say that I get a forward and someone actually wants to use my music, How is the contract done? Through TAXI?Once your music is forwarded, Taxi is out of the equation. The listee contacts you directly, and you negotiate directly with them. The success forum is for folks to let us know about their forwards and deals, without this part of the forum, no one (not even Taxi) would know that you made a deal if you didn't say so. It can take several months, or over a year to be contacted after a forward... assuming they contact you. Songwriting isn't a short term thing.
"As we are creative beings, our lives become our works of art." (Julia Cameron)

Link: Vikki Flawith Music
Link: For the 'Shy Singer'
Link: The Shy Songwriter's Blog

User avatar
hummingbird
Total Pro
Total Pro
Posts: 6885
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 11:50 am
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Possible member (reluctant)

Post by hummingbird » Thu Aug 30, 2007 9:21 am

The other question I have is do you get feedback on every song you forward or upload?You don't get any feedback on any songs you upload to your page. You only get feedback on submissions - and if you are submitting to a listing that says Taxi will be doing critiques. You will see 'no critiques by Taxi' listings. However, you WILL hear as to whether or not you were forwarded. You do not get any feedback on Dispatch.Before you upgrade to Dispatch, I would sign up to get the listings for awhile. I'd post up a song in the Peer to Peer forum, along with the details of the listing, and ask if we think it would be a good fit. If your stuff is getting forwarded / good reviews on regular listings & you're getting good marks on production, then Dispatch might be a good idea - but only if you either have a catalogue of broadcast quality stuff, or if you can produce it quickly.Is that what members see when looking for listings or is it in a different format?- I get my listings by email. Some folks are mailed regular listings. But that's what it looks like.Also what are these music libraries that I am hearing about?Okay, this is a good question. Because I have a question back you -- why are you even considering spending money on a Taxi membership if you don't know the music marketplace or how songwriters make their money? This is crucial information. You have to know. If you don't know, it's like opening a coffee shop on a deserted island. There are tons of articles on the Taxi site that explain the basics, and as I said in other post, John Braheny's "The Craft & the Business of Songwriting" is a great resource.http://www.taxi.com/faq/index.htmlHummin'bird PS - for me Taxi has been an educational tool to bring my music to the level of getting forwards and deals. I posted something about that recently.... here's the thread...http://taxi.proboards27.com/index.cgi?a ... 032&page=1
"As we are creative beings, our lives become our works of art." (Julia Cameron)

Link: Vikki Flawith Music
Link: For the 'Shy Singer'
Link: The Shy Songwriter's Blog

jewelwing
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 8:42 am
Contact:

Re: Possible member (reluctant)

Post by jewelwing » Thu Aug 30, 2007 11:05 am

A little bit more on the Dispatch option:Elsewhere in this forum are some comments about higher numbers of forwards with Dispatch listings, and some comments on success with Dispatch listings. Click on "search," and type "Disptach" into the search box to find those comments in the forum. But success and cost aside, not everyone can effectively use the Dispatch service. Industry people choose a Dispatch listing when they want something fast. So you either need to already have what is needed, or be able to produce it fast. If you can meet a short deadline, and have been watching the Dispatch listings for appropriate listings (as hummingbird suggests), then you can quickly sign up for Dispatch when you decide it's time (usually when you see the listings that would be a good match for your music). It probably also helps to already have your music online with TAXI, for fast online submission to listings.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests