Talking about the Nashville high bar

Liked your review? Rave about it! Hated it, let us know!

Moderators: admin, mdc, TAXIstaff

geo
Serious Musician
Serious Musician
Posts: 1308
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2007 6:05 am
Contact:

Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by geo » Wed Sep 19, 2007 6:12 am

Hey guys, do screeners ever consider a good song slightly off genre? I just received a return, no big deal, but the screener like the song, gave a good review (he liked the lyrics, hook and melody ), but thought it was off genre, which I knew it was. It's a simple, fun, 1/ / 4/ 5/, rock and roll song I wrote for my band back in the day and thought it fit the bill for the type of song they were looking for. Not discouraged and will continue submitting but should I not bother with the Nashville listings (there's another this month it might fit)? I do plan on recording a cleaner (lyrically) version for a teen pop listing but unfortunately I don't have access to the original master... GeoFun, rousing, rockin' CONTEMPORARY COUNTRY-ROCK SONGS are needed by the VP of A&R at Major Nashville Label for an established hit group a la TRICK PONY. Great "Southern bar band/redneck country-rock" songs are OK, as this band likes to get rowdy, but the bottom line is they need HITS. So great lyrics, hooks, and melodies all have to be there. All tempos are OK, but up-tempos are always preferred. The song is "Good time's all it is"www.taxi.com/geo

geo
Serious Musician
Serious Musician
Posts: 1308
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2007 6:05 am
Contact:

Re: Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by geo » Wed Sep 19, 2007 8:40 am

Rob, thanks man, like I said I didn't disagree with the off genre reason for the return, but since country is not "my thing" I thought I would take a shot with a song that fit the bill otherwise (fun, rousing, rockin') but hey it's only $5 and the critique was good. When I do the rerecord I might try a version with cleaner guitars for the country listings and try again , like I said it's only $5 (but they do add up )...Geo

jchitty
Serious Musician
Serious Musician
Posts: 4266
Joined: Tue Jun 23, 2009 5:20 pm
Contact:

Re: Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by jchitty » Wed Sep 19, 2007 9:09 am

Nashville's a very tough nut to crack.....you're not just writing a country song, you're supposed to write a 'specific' country song. Sometimes to get a song past the gate, I think you have to know the personality of the artists you are pitching too. In other words, if you're pitching to someone specific like Kenny Chesney, maybe a beachy type tune or a particular type love song is best.I was thinking about pitching to a Sarah Evans listing not too long ago.....and as odd as this sounds, I know she's going through a divorce, so I thought my song might not be appropriate for her. Country singers seem to want to keep a certain image (which is okay) so if you send them stuff off target, it's more likely, your song won't be fowarded. This is something I'm learning. The people who work for them know how their emotions run, what they love, and what they do and do not want to sing.....if you can find that magical something, then I think you're onto something.BTW, I am having probs with my computer again.....I can't get the TAXI hosting page open....will try to listen to the song later.

jchitty
Serious Musician
Serious Musician
Posts: 4266
Joined: Tue Jun 23, 2009 5:20 pm
Contact:

Re: Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by jchitty » Sat Nov 03, 2007 6:45 am

Hey, Tanja I think it's always wise to put your best foot foward and make the most professional and polished demo you can. I've heard that simple guitar or piano demoes can do the trick, but they must sound great. I approached this in a backwards way when I first started submitting. I had the demoes professionally produced at a place in Nashville, and I ran up a small fortune on my credit card. I was very pleased with the demoes this place did for me. However, I had some lyrics issues with my songs, so that resulted in returns. Even the excellent production couldn't hide the flaws in my songs. I'd say you could go either way, simple demoes or grand production.....the main thing is, you have to make sure that whatever form you submit is foward worthy. I think years ago, A & R reps could imagine what a song would be like and they actually preferred simple demoes, but as you know, it's a different world out there now.I've since learned to also get critiques or thoughts from TAXI or its members.....it's better to do this before making and pitching your demo. This can save you time and money. Not that I'm an authority on getting fowards, LOL. I've only gotten one high bar foward for a Nashville listing, but that made me feel like I was on the right track anyway. I only pitch to the Nashville high bar listings, at least for now.I haven't been submitting a whole lot lately because I'm more in the process of writing now, but it seems that I'm starting to grasp some of the concepts of what it takes to get a foward....seems like I'm getting there because I've learned through the TAXI critiques.One other thing....I wish I had that formula for writing a song that perfectly targeted a country singer, but I gotta say that sometimes, it's just a crap shoot.....wish I knew how to create that wonderful chemistry that jumps out and says to an artist, 'please sing me.' I think the best you can do is just listen to current country music and try to get a feel for what they're wanting right now.

squidlips
Committed Musician
Committed Musician
Posts: 808
Joined: Tue Jun 23, 2009 5:20 pm
Contact:

Re: Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by squidlips » Tue Nov 20, 2007 5:44 am

Quote:Hi Geo. I've had a song with 9's and one 8 returned with the main comment being that the lyrical subject matter did not fit the personal situation of the recipient. That's interesting. Up next? Mindreading!! Holy cow. I'd have brought that up in a phone call to Taxi, myself.

paults
Impressive
Impressive
Posts: 261
Joined: Mon Nov 28, 2005 2:23 am
Location: Central Ohio
Contact:

Re: Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by paults » Tue Nov 20, 2007 9:53 am

I somehow doubt Glen Campbell was ever one, either

User avatar
Casey H
King of the World
King of the World
Posts: 12384
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2004 3:22 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Contact:

Re: Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by Casey H » Tue Nov 20, 2007 10:26 am

Quote:I somehow doubt Glen Campbell was ever one, either Did you know he was once a member of the Beach Boys?

User avatar
sgs4u
Serious Musician
Serious Musician
Posts: 3122
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:39 pm
Gender: Male
Location: Vancouver
Contact:

Re: Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by sgs4u » Tue Nov 20, 2007 10:42 am

Quote:Quote:I somehow doubt Glen Campbell was ever one, either Did you know he was once a member of the Beach Boys?Glen Campbell a member fo the BBs? Being a member and getting hired to do the session on guitar, aren't exactly the same. Was he actually a part of the band, or a hired mercenarey? Hey I just ran across this awesome country tune. I thought the lyric is just perfect, then I listened to the song, and I was a little disappointed, but it still is a great story song. Would taxi screeners forward this tune? It's not a cowboy party song, I'm betting that they would likely move it on up the ladder...Trace Adkin's doing this (Jim Collins/Sunny Russ) tune.http://video.aol.com/video/music-trace- ... 122875Then They DoIn the early rush of morning,Trying to get the kids to school:One's hanging on my shirt-tail,Another's locked up in her room.And I'm yelling up the stairs:"Stop worrying 'bout your hair, you look fine."Then they're fightin' in the backseat,And I'm playing referee.Now someone's gotta go,The moment that we leave.And everybody's late,I swear that I can't wait till they grow up.Then they do, and that's how it is.It's just quiet in the mornin',Can't believe how much you miss,All they do and all they did.You want all the dreams they dreamed of to come true:Then they do.Now the youngest is starting college,She'll be leavin' in the Fall.And Brianna's latest boyfriend,Called to ask if we could talk.And I got the impression,That he's about to pop the question any day.I look over at their pictures,Sittin' in their frames.I see them as babies:I guess that'll never change.You pray all their lives,That someday they will find happiness.Then they do, and that's how it is.It's just quiet in the mornin',Can't believe how much you miss,All they do and all they did.You want all the dreams they dreamed of to come true:Then they do.No more Monday PTA's,No carpools, or soccer games.Your work is done.Now you've got time that's all your own.You've been waitin' for so long,For those days to come.Then they do, and that's how it is.It's just quiet in the mornin',Can't believe how much you miss,All they do and all they did.You want all the dreams they dreamed of to come true:Then they do.Ah, then they do.

User avatar
Casey H
King of the World
King of the World
Posts: 12384
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2004 3:22 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Contact:

Re: Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by Casey H » Tue Nov 20, 2007 11:20 am

Quote:Glen Campbell a member fo the BBs? Being a member and getting hired to do the session on guitar, aren't exactly the same. Was he actually a part of the band, or a hired mercenarey? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glen_CampbellQuote: He was a full-fledged member of The Beach Boys, filling in for an ailing Brian Wilson on tour in 1964 and 1965 and he also played on the Pet Sounds album. Apparently in 1964, Brian Wilson had a major anxiety attack and couldn't perform. Glen Campell was brought in to replace him... Casey

User avatar
sgs4u
Serious Musician
Serious Musician
Posts: 3122
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:39 pm
Gender: Male
Location: Vancouver
Contact:

Re: Talking about the Nashville high bar

Post by sgs4u » Tue Nov 20, 2007 11:33 am

Being a member of the band, in my experience, means being a member of the company that enjoys the profits from the writing of the songs. Campbell was a session player who was also hired to do those tours. But that's just semantics anyway, Casey. From the perspective of someone going to a show, Glen Campbell was IN the band. I understand that. This looks like our discussion of the term, "friends," once upon a time. I hope you realize you're on my short list of friends now, Casey. Quote:Quote:Glen Campbell a member fo the BBs? Being a member and getting hired to do the session on guitar, aren't exactly the same. Was he actually a part of the band, or a hired mercenarey? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glen_CampbellQuote: He was a full-fledged member of The Beach Boys, filling in for an ailing Brian Wilson on tour in 1964 and 1965 and he also played on the Pet Sounds album. Apparently in 1964, Brian Wilson had a major anxiety attack and couldn't perform. Glen Campell was brought in to replace him... Casey

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests